Global Biodiversity Conservation and the Alleviation of Poverty

Authors: 
Turner, W.R., Brandon, K., Brooks, T.M., Gascon, C., Gibbs, H.K., Lawrence, K.S., Mittermeier, R.A. and Selig, E.R.
Year / Month: 
2012-01
Reference type: 
Journal Article
Source name: 
BioScience
Page Numbers: 
pp. 85-92
Publisher: 
University of California Press
Summary: 

Poverty and biodiversity loss are two of the world's dire challenges. Claims of conservation's contribution to poverty alleviation, however, remain controversial. Here, we assess the flows of ecosystem services provided to people by priority habitats for terrestrial conservation, considering the global distributions of biodiversity, physical factors, and socioeconomic context. We estimate the value of these habitats to the poor, both through direct benefits and through payments for ecosystem services to those stewarding natural habitats. The global potential for biodiversity conservation to support poor communities is high: The top 25% of conservation priority areas could provide 56%–57% of benefits. The aggregate benefits are valued at three times the estimated opportunity costs and exceed $1 per person per day for 331 million of the world's poorest people. Although trade-offs remain, these results show win–win synergies between conservation and poverty alleviation, indicate that effective financial mechanisms can enhance these synergies, and suggest biodiversity conservation as a fundamental component of sustainable economic development.

Themes: 
Poverty-Environment Linkages

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The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is an international network of organisations that promotes learning on the linkages between biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction.

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During the current financial year (to March 2014) the PCLG website is funded by the Arcus Foundation, UK aid, Sida and Danida, however, the views expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of these organisations.

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